A rocket lawyer has just been named one of the most successful immigration lawyers in the world, a title which means he’s earned the right to call himself a rocket.

Daniel Johnson, 44, is best known for representing clients who have gone through the legal system but who now face the prospect of deportation.

“I’ve worked with some of the highest profile cases in the country, and it’s really gratifying to see that this has been recognised by the courts,” Mr Johnson told the ABC’s Lateline program.

“The only thing that’s more gratifying than having to deal with an individual who’s been here a long time and is not necessarily on the radar of the system is seeing that their case is now being heard.”

Mr Johnson has been working with people from Central America, the Middle East, and the Asia-Pacific region for more than 20 years, and is now one of only five lawyers in Australia working on immigration cases.

He said his clients were often facing extreme circumstances, such as family reunification, and could be forced to leave their homes.

“It’s really quite challenging and I’ve had to work really hard to get it right,” he said.

“They don’t have a choice but to make it to Australia because it’s a much more attractive destination, particularly for children.”

I’ve seen a lot of young people leave their home countries and travel across the world to find a new life, and I think that’s one of our biggest problems.

Immigration Minister Peter Dutton has said he is “extremely proud” of Mr Johnson, and praised him for his work. “

So it’s not just for the young people who come here but for all those other people who have to deal in the future.”

Immigration Minister Peter Dutton has said he is “extremely proud” of Mr Johnson, and praised him for his work.

“He has been a true asset to our community for many years, having worked on many of the greatest immigration cases of the last 20 years,” Mr Dutton said.

He also thanked Mr Johnson for his hard work and dedication.

“His work on behalf of asylum seekers and asylum seekers on the basis of humanitarian concerns has been very commendable,” he told ABC Radio.

“If you look at his work and his credentials, you can see why he’s one our top ten.” “

Immigration lawyers on the rise, with numbers rising for the first time Since 2009, the number of immigration lawyers on Australia’s radar has risen by almost 20 per cent, with a record 961 in the past 12 months, according to the Australian Bar Association. “

If you look at his work and his credentials, you can see why he’s one our top ten.”

Immigration lawyers on the rise, with numbers rising for the first time Since 2009, the number of immigration lawyers on Australia’s radar has risen by almost 20 per cent, with a record 961 in the past 12 months, according to the Australian Bar Association.

In the past six months, the numbers have grown by 30 per cent in the first two years of the financial year, and more than 40 per cent since January.

It’s not uncommon for lawyers to work on immigration issues in remote areas.

In some remote communities, the legal profession is particularly popular, but in other remote areas, it’s more difficult to find work, and there are few opportunities to practise in areas where people are more vulnerable.

Immigration lawyers said the rise in cases had a lot to do with the Government’s policy of allowing asylum seekers to stay in Australia until they had a decision about their future.

“People are coming out of the asylum system because of the Government policy and the policy of the previous government, and that’s really where the increase is,” said Steven Wilson, chief executive of the Immigration Lawyers Association.

Mr Wilson said there was a large backlog of asylum cases and the government was trying to speed up the processing of those cases. “

But when they have an opportunity to do so, the increase in the numbers has gone through.”

Mr Wilson said there was a large backlog of asylum cases and the government was trying to speed up the processing of those cases.

“What we’ve seen is a real increase in asylum cases.

The backlog has gone up by 50 per cent,” he explained.

“There’s a big increase in people coming out, but people are also coming in and saying, ‘I’ve been told this case is in the backlog, so I’m going to go back and work on it, and if I do it in a timely manner, I can come back here and finish it’.”